Palestinian supporters rally in Dublin, Ireland; call Israelis “a bunch of rats.”

Newspaper tweets video in which Palestinian supporters describe Israelis as “a bunch of rats”

Today, the Irish Daily Mirror — an Irish tabloid — shared a video from an anti-Israel demo outside the Israeli Embassy in Ballsbridge Dublin — their preferred venue for spewing lies and hate towards the Jewish State.

The tweet that accompanied the footage was as follows:

Playing the video, however, plainly reveals another chant that the newspaper conveniently neglected to mention in their report.

“From the river to the flat … Israel [sic] a bunch of rats.

(Note: while it’s hard to make out the first part of the chant — what I heard was ‘from the river to the flat … which I presume means the West Bank — the second part is clearly audible).

As one commenter pointed out:

There’s Plenty of Anti-Semitism in Ireland To Go Around

While a group of hundreds of “Pro-Palestinian” protesters liking Israelis to vermin might be shocking to some (an almost obvious manifestation of anti-Semitism), truth be told, I wasn’t that surprised by it.

As I wrote here in March, it’s been my lifelong contention that there’s no shortage of anti-Semitism in Ireland. Even though I have met plenty of (fellow) Irish Jews who would stridently disagree with me or call me an alarmist for making the claim.

Anybody following the reaction from Irish Twitter users to the events in Israel and Gaza recently — or on TheJournal.ie, Ireland’s main online news source — will encounter a steady barrage of anti-Semitism flying under the thin cover of opposition to Israel.

There’s barely a trope or canard that doesn’t get aired countless times per day, including:

  • Comparisons between Israel and a German regime that sought the global elimination of the Jewish people
  • Allegations that Israel “controls the media”
  • The gross lie that Israel is conducting “ethnic cleansing” through its aerial campaign in Gaza designed to thwart Hamas rocket fire (while minimizing civilian casualties). Miriam O’Callaghan, an Irish television presenter who fronts the Prime Time news show, described that same targeted aerial attack as “indiscriminate” while asking an Israeli ambassador whether “Israel has brought it [the hostilities] ‘upon itself.’”

When I sent in a news report about how the Green Pass report was going in Israel to the same TV show I witnessed, much to my surprise, a steady torrent of anti-Semitic replies from Ireland in return.

To my surprise, users grossly likened the Green Pass to the Jude star that Jews were forced to wear before being deported to concentration camps.

There can be no other basis for such a distorted, inaccurate, and grossly offensive statement than a hatred for Jews.

Despite whatever the countless online Israel haters from Ireland will tell you — that they hate Israel, not Jews — or when they attempt to gaslight the undecided by alleging that anybody pointing out bald anti-Semitism is “playing the race card,” there is, I believe, a significant amount of anti-Semitism emanating from Ireland.

And the logic is obvious.

If a significant amount of Palestinian supporters in Ireland are happy to espouse obviously anti-Semitic views … and the large majority of the country seems to virulently espouse the Palestinian cause … then there is a significant amount of anti-Semitism in Ireland.

Anybody who tells you otherwise — whether they are an Irish Jew or otherwise — is trying to skirt around an inconvenient truth.

Much of it is on obvious and daily display whenever anything to do with Israel. Those seeking it don’t have to look far.

Marketing communications consultant interested in tech, Linux, beer, async, business continuity, and remote work (in no particular order). RosehillMarcom.com